Category: Spring Training

The Definitive Guide to Oakland A’s Minor League Spring Training

Originally published 03/06/16 on OaklandClubhouse.com

03/06/2016

Everything you need to know about the Oakland A’s minor league spring training schedule — from times and game locations to maps of the facilities and tips for maximizing your experience

To even the most casual baseball fan, spring training is a fun experience. You don’t have to be able to name the 1981 World Series MVPs to enjoy sitting in the warm sun with a cool beverage in hand watching a split squad game between the Oakland A’s and the LA Dodgers at Camelback Ranch in Glendale. Just enjoy the environment and watch out for fly balls. However, if your son, brother, boyfriend, or husband is one of those players on the field and in uniform, then the entirety of spring training means something different to you. Especially if his games aren’t played in the stadium, but on the back fields.

It’s for this group of Arizona-bound travelers that I offer this quick guide to spring training. Maneuvering around the backfields of various facilities isn’t as easy as it could be, especially when no two facilities operate the same way. Especially if this is your first, with a vested interest. In addition to these tips, you’ll also find a comprehensive schedule of minor league games and their locations, as well as maps to each team scheduled to play this spring.

First: If you traveled to Mesa this summer or fall to see him in the Arizona Rookie League (AZL) or perhaps during the Fall Instructional League, don’t expect much to be the same. Spring training is run by the big league clubs. Unlike the non-revenue-generating AZL and Instructional Leagues, spring training is big money for the teams, for local businesses, and for the state of Arizona. Security is very tight, too.

The good news is that admission to minor league spring training games are still free – that’s one thing they have in common. Parking, however, may set you back, depending on the facility. First, let’s review some essentials:

The Basic Information

Minor League spring training games, just like those during Instructs, are not official games. There are no official stats nor any media coverage. Since these are exhibition games, the opponents are local to save on travel and time (in other words, not all Cactus League teams will square off during minor league spring training).

Games start at 1pm local time on the minor league fields.

There are four teams divided into two squads – Triple-A, & Double-A /  High-A & Low-A.

Two games are played at each location. They play the same opposing team on the same day, but one squad will travel to the opponents fields while the other squad will play at home.

  • For instance: Wednesday, March 23rd: the Athletics and Cubs face each other.
  • Oakland’s AAA/AA squad travel the four miles to Sloan Park
  • Oakland’s A+/A squads host the Cubs at Fitch Park
  • Then, on Tuesday, March 28th, the two organizations face off again. This time the AAA/AA squads stay at Fitch and host the Cubs, while the A+/A clubs travel to Sloan.

Anything and everything can be changed without notice. The players go where they’re told; don’t rely on them to update you with changes. No one informs me either, but if I do learn of changes, I will tweet it out, but I am not informed ahead of time of changes.

Always bring with you to games:

  • 2 WATER BOTTLES per person {1 frozen} and some easy snacks such as grapes, crackers, nothing that melts.
  • Concession stands are not open during the games. Restrooms are open.
  • Remember to always clean up after yourself.
  • Sunscreen
  • Comfortable shoes (there will be some walking, no matter where)
  • Optional, but one that I strongly suggest is a towel to sit on. There are usually metal bleachers to sit on, but cannot guarantee their cleanliness.

PLAN TO ARRIVE EARLY, ESPECIALLY AT AWAY GAMES, ESPECIALLY THOSE NEXT TO A STADIUM WITH A GAME ALSO BEING PLAYED AT 1PM.

Be patient arriving and departing; traffic can be bad with all games starting at the same time. Most parking attendants, etc. are only focused on the big league (revenue generating) game. Often, especially at the start of games, the “security” or parking staffers don’t even know there are games being played. This can be very confusing – not to mention frustrating.

MINOR LEAGUE GAME PARKING:

Is a pain at the Giants Minor League Facility on the south east quadrant of Hayden and Camelback Rd (not Scottsdale Stadium)

Limited parking lot that is shared with a city run fitness facility. Parking down the street is most likely an option – this is where the comfy shoes come into play.

  • Bring cash for parking at: Angels (Tempe Diablo) and possibly Cubs

The Cubs sell out almost every game, and traffic on Rio Salado & Dobson (the main artery to Sloan Park) is designed for one thing only: the revenue generating game in the stadium.

As you’ll see on the maps I created for this purpose, you’ll see the less-traditional way to get into the minor league fields at Sloan Park.

Salt River Fields is home to the Rockies and Diamondbacks

  • Rockies fields and entrance are on the SOUTH side of the complex
  • Dbacks fields and entrance are on the NORTH side (off Via de Ventura)

Camelback Ranch Glendale is home to the White Sox and Dodgers. For only one day, the AAA / AA A’s travel west to play the Dodgers. There is a game in the stadium, but it’s a 7pm start. Parking should not be a challenge. There should be signs directing where to go for Minor League games. Just be sure you’re going to the right set of games.

And then there’s the home facility – Fitch Park.

The only restrictions are: 

  • Please park in the general lot – just off to the right, past the entrance to the fields – and walk back to the field entrance.
  • As at all facilities, the Tower is for team staff (as in “decision makers”) only.

It’s good to be home.

STADIUM PARKING

In the even that you choose to attend a stadium game while you’re here, bring cash to park when seeing the following teams: Angels, Cubs, A’s, Padres, & Mariners. They all charge for parking at stadium games. Reason being there are volunteer groups that help out throughout the stadiums, and the parking fees generally support the volunteer group.

Keep in mind: Triple A and Double A games begin Wednesday, March 16th at the Cubs. There is no game at the stadium that day, so it will be much easier getting in and out. The lower level games – A+ and A – begin Monday, March 21st AT THE GIANTS facility. Sorry.

The Game Schedule

Oakland A’s 2016 Minor League spring training schedule

The Maps

Map to Tempe Diablo Stadium

Bruce Maxwell to Suit Up for Team Germany – WBC

Originally published 02/09/16 on OaklandClubhouse.com 

2016-03-06 12.33.15

KIMBERLY CONTRERAS

02/09/2016

Oakland A’s catching prospect Bruce Maxwell will participate in the World Baseball Classic qualifying tournament with Team Germany.

MESA, AZ — The Oakland A’s pitchers and catchers officially report to big league camp on February 20th. Catcher Bruce Maxwell — a non-roster invitee to the A’s big league camp — is already in the Phoenix area getting ready for the season. His energy is high, his focus is unwavering, and his mindset is void of all things counterproductive. His time with the big league club will be paused for a week in mid-March, but it’s for a very good reason.

On March 14th, Maxwell will leave Mesa, Arizona, and join Team Germany as they head to Mexicali, Mexico, to compete in a qualifying round for the 2017 World Baseball Classic. The four-day, six-game double elimination tournament begins on March 17 when Maxwell and Team Germany take on Nicaragua at 12:30 pm PST. Mexico will host the Czech Republic in the night cap of Day 1 at Mexicali’s Estadio B Air.

Maxwell learned of Team Germany’s interest in adding him to their roster from A’s Director of Player Development Keith Lieppman.

“It is a great honor to be able to suit up and do what I can to help Germany win the qualifier and advance to the World Baseball Classic,” Maxwell said.

Lieppman says the honor is well deserved.

“Bruce has become a top flight receiver after making huge progress in his receiving and throwing skills,” Lieppman said. “He has a good grasp of pitch sequencing and building good relationships with his pitching staff.”

And, though it is the oft-mocked statement made by players as they report to spring training, Lieppman’s concluding statement is, in fact, true: “Bruce is in the best shape of his career.”

The Alabama native was born in Weisbaden, Germany, while his father, a career Army officer, was stationed there. In 2012, Oakland drafted Maxwell in the 2nd round out of Birmingham Southern College, where he was named the Division III National Player of the Year. His power bat from the left side and natural leadership ability led the 6’2”, 230lb Maxwell to the backstop position, where his defensive and game-calling skills have strengthened each season.

A member of the back-to-back Texas League Champion Midland RockHounds in 2014 and 2015, Maxwell’s past two seasons have been about growth and development. Maxwell’s first focus as a pro was improving defensively — catching was relatively new to him when he turned pro. Since arriving in Midland midway through the 2014 season, he has had to adjust to Double-A pitching while playing in a home ballpark tough on left-handed power-hitters. That adjustment was made a little more challenging for the Army kid, who only knew to try harder and do more in order to improve. A true blessing, according to Maxwell, has been the trust and guidance of A’s minor league pitching coach John Wasdin, and the recent addition of minor league hitting coach Eric Martins.

Martins, a former A’s farmhand himself, joined the RockHounds in 2015 after spending the past several years as a highly respected A’s area scout, says that Maxwell has been finding his identity at the plate.

“Bruce learned a lot about himself as a hitter,” Martins said. “The last few years he was caught up in trying to hit for power and he forgot that he can hit and that the power will come. The numbers don’t show it, but Bruce has as much raw power as anyone we have in the organization. He focused on solidifying his approach and pick and choose when he wants to try and hit a ball out. Defensively, he did an outstanding job in handling the pitching staff and having a good, solid game plan against opposing hitters.

“He’s really cleaned it up behind the plate and has turned himself into a really good defender. He’s a hard worker who is always one of the first guys to the field; working out and getting in his routine. He’s really hard on himself and wants to do well so much that sometimes it’s to his demise. Left-handed hitting catchers with power are an enticing commodity and Bruce fits that mold well. This is a big year for him; he knows it and he’s spent the off-season getting after it. I think the organization will be pleased by what they see on him in spring training.”

Prior to the last WBC, Team Canada — which included Joey Votto, Justin Morneau andMichael Saunders — put an end to Germany’s journey.  Though Maxwell doesn’t yet know who his teammates will be, as anyone who knows, or has ever even met the charismatic catcher, there are no strangers in this world, as far as Maxwell is concerned; just friends he hasn’t yet met. He’s a man of the people, a true fan favorite, and an incredible teammate. On March 21st, regardless of which country advances to play in 2017, one thing is for sure, there will be a spike in the international fan base of the Oakland A’s by way of Bruce Maxwell.